Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Clocks


Clocks - how many do you have in your life?

In this cottage - let us see --- One on the stove, microwave, computer, on the walls, and sitting on various tables.

The last move - my son would drive me to the country with special items. On several trips I would hold the clocks that have such personal meaning to me (my mother's and grandmother's) in my lap and beside me.

So---my grandmother's clock, two of my mother's, grandmother floor clock that chimes, clock on library table, and a tiny travel clock that was purchased in Jamaica 45 years ago, is on my nightstand.

Oh, an old school clock that I still have not found a place to hang and another special wall clock that chimes - if it is working - it is waiting for me to find a clock repair man.

Difficult to find someone that works on clocks. For years I was very fortunate as my stepfather loved working on clocks and kept mine in good running order.

That is a lot of clocks. I like them all and hardly hear them ticking away. I find them comforting. A reminder of times long ago. Sometimes in the night the thought arises that I do not hear the clocks . Just so accustomed to them, they are already at home in the woods, and I am hardly aware of them

I have them spaced so they all do not chime at once. Some chime on the hour, some every 15 minutes. Some just tick and do not chime. They are all different.

When one of my daughter's make a visit, she tells me she cannot sleep with all the clocks chiming. I just tell her to use earplugs "I hardly hear them."

I can remember many years ago, when my oldest granddaughter stayed with me for a short time while her parents went on a trip. She was about 18 months old, slept in my bedroom and would say to me
"grandma your clocks go tick tock all night."

Thoughts arise - who will love these clocks like One Woman? Maybe a grandchild will enjoy their sound.


To think
she is having thoughts
of not
wearing a watch
on her wrist
so she
does not plan
just
lets her spirit
guide her time ....

14 comments:

lilalia said...

Must confess we have only two battery operated clocks in our place. My grandfathers both had respectable windup-every-night-before-going-to-bed clocks whose tick-tocking accompanied our dreams.

One Woman's Journey said...

lilalia, just reread what I wrote.
Here I built this simple woods cottage and got rid of so much. But my clocks came with me.

Darla said...

My mom treasures her clocks, too! I could do without them entirely (okay, mostly). When I 'retired' from office work 8 years ago, the first thing I did was remove my wristwatch...I've rarely worn it since.

Balisha said...

I think that we have a dozen clocks. Used to use the cuckoo clock and some would say that they couldn't sleep...and I would turn it off. I love to listen to the ticking while I fall asleep. Balisha

Cape Cod Kitty said...

That clock in the photo is exquisite. The workmanship in the old pieces is so artful. My next door neighbor repairs antique clocks and people bring them from all over the place as well as mail them for repair. He is quite well-respected and thorough. Too bad we are not closer.
Although I still work full-time, I stopped wearing a watch years ago and do not miss it all. If I am out and about the cell phone tells me the time. I grew up with lots of ticking clocks and loved the sound, now I do treasure total silence although I just bet I would adjust again. LM's house is full of antique clocks but none of them work! Nice to look at, though.

Tabor said...

I have electric clocks all over. No tick tockers. I do not like the sound of time passing...like your grandchildren.

One Woman's Journey said...

Darla, Balisha, Marcia and Tabor, thank you for visiting.
The clock in the picture was my great grandmother's.
The sound of the clocks - I DO NOT EVEN HEAR. I think it is because I am so use to their sound :)

the wild magnolia said...

Clocks. I do not have enough of them. A lovely Bulova my youngest daughter gave me is my one and only.

My Aunt Martha Jane had a large clock on the fireplace mantle. A large chime clock that tic-tocked loudly and I loved it.

Enjoyed your post and the poem at the finish.

Thank you!

judemiller1 said...

I haven't worn a wrist watch in years and years. I have many clocks--my favorite is the cuckoo clock--I never hear is during the night either.

Deborah Carr said...

"they are already at home in the woods" - I like this, like they must also accustom themselves to new spaces, find a new rhythm...then set the proper pace to fit.

(Nice to see you are still well and content...after my long absence)

Lonely Rivers said...

"My grandfather's clock was too large for the shelf so it stood ninety years on the floor. It was taller by half than the old man himself, but it weighed not a pennyweight more."
Your post reminded me of this song sung in Junior High Chorus about fifty years ago. Isn't it amazing how someone's blogpost can trigger a personal memory? Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

One Woman's Journey said...

WM and Judy - thank you for visiting.
Deborah and LM - see why I love writing. Seems like someone always shares something that makes me smile. Yes, our sharing brings special memories to mind.
Deborah - welcome back...

LauraX said...

When I was a child my parents brought home two fine clocks from Switzerland...one a chime, the other a cuckoo...the chime only rang on the hour the cuckoo once at the half...then the number of the hour plus music (and tiny dancers circling round) at the hour...but they were never aligned the two clocks, close but never the same. They keep these clocks still and when we visit the sounds remind me of childhood. In our house only digital by the bedside, the computer, microwave, stove, phone and cell phone...but I too prefer the rhythm of the sun to guide me...if the kids didn't have to be up so early for school that would work much better...perhaps another reason I love summer so much!

Sharon said...

Two antique clocks in my house have special prominence ~ one in my bedroom chimes on the half hour and the hour; and one in the living room starts with one quarter of the grace "Hark to the chimes, Come bow your head, We thank Thee Lord, For this good bread" and adds a quarter more each 15 minutes with the whole song on the hour with chimes. Like Laura's clocks they are close in keeping time but not exact.

It is hard to find someone who knows what they're doing to repair antique clocks.